Registration CDD 2022

Update: General registration closed on 8/10/22, but if you need to cancel registration for any session that previously planned to attend, please use the My Event Account Page button to the right. Any other inquires are can be submitted to cetl@udmercy.edu

Sessions for Colleague Development Days will take place in the Chemistry Building (CHM) and the Commerce & Finance Building (CF). Day One Lunch will be offered at the McNichols Library on the first floor.

There is still time to register for the Mentoring Workshop presented by the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD) on 8/25/22, proceed to the bottom of this page for more information and to register.

Note: Locations and links for the sessions will be posted on this page, please check back soon.

Directions for Registration:

Welcome to the registration hub for the 2022 Fall Colleague Development Days event. Below, you will find descriptions, times, and modalities for all of the scheduled sessions and activities for this event, including a bonus mentoring workshop on August 25, 2022. In order to view the full session description and objectives, click on the + (plus sign) symbol adjacent to the title of each session.

You will be prompted to sign in with your Microsoft credentials before you add sessions to your cart. Please do so in order to ensure session registration and to receive updated information about event locations as we move closer to the event.

To select sessions that you plan to attend, simply click on the Add to Cart button for each session.

Each time block offers three face-to-face sessions and one online session. Please choose and register for only one event from each time block. You will see the sessions you have selected in your cart.

Please be sure to click on Checkout button once you have added all sessions/events to your cart that you wish to attend. The Checkout button is located at the bottom of your cart that contains your session list on the top right side of the page. Once, complete you should receive an email reflecting your selected sessions.

You may edit your session selections if needed.

Additional information:

  • Registration is required for the complimentary networking lunch on Day One.
  • Food truck will be on site on Day Two for participants to purchase lunch.
  • In-person and online sessions are indicated, please use the legend below the keynote listing
  • A PDF version of the schedule can be downloaded here

Please note, registration for Colleague Development Days will close at midnight EST on August 10, 2022.

DAY ONE: AUGUST 17, 2022

Featured Keynote Speaker: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (90 min.)

Keynote Address: Mark Ostach

Keynote Address: Mark Ostach

Embracing Change & Cultivating Connection

Fostering digital wellness can lead to better relationships, more satisfaction at work, and a reduction in employee burnout particularly in times of change. In Mark’s uplifting talk, he will explore the importance in digital wellbeing and effective communication during times of change.
Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff  Location: CHM 114 (Chemistry Building-McNichols Campus)
See more from Mark Ostach in the media reel below:    

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.


Session Legend

Indicates an in-person session.


Indicates an online session presented in Zoom.


A: 10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. (60 min.)

Session A1: Beating Burnout in a Complex and Evolving Workplace Environment by Building Resiliency, Teamwork, and Mental Capacity

Presented by Michelle Whalen

Professional burnout, often accompanied by physical or emotional exhaustion, produces negative effects on both professional abilities and personal lives. This session will help to create a foundation of understanding regarding burnout to better understand where we are, how we got here, and the long-term impacts of sustained professional stress. In addition to raising understanding, this session will provide a variety of data-driven tools to assist us with dealing with professional burnout and its implications.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. This session will create a foundation for understanding workplace burnout including the potential impacts on mental fatigue and outcomes and the long-term effects on those coping with it.
  2. This session will establish opportunities to develop and to build burn out mitigation measures into the workplace using evidence-driven interventions.
  3. This session will identify key strategies to assess burnout in a workplace environment and develop opportunities to improve team resiliency.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session A2: Knowledge, Assessment, and Grading: Theories and Best Practices

Presented by Mike Verdusco and Erin Bell, CETL

Have you heard about spec grading or ungrading and wondered what they are all about? It can be a challenge to determine the assessment methods and strategies to promote and measure comprehension and/or subject matter. This session will provide the means for attendees to consider a variety of assessment modalities and grading methods based on a review of broad definitions of knowledge and assessment.

The session will provide discussions of standards-based grading, ungrading, mastery-based testing, specifications grading, and other assessments, exploring the merits and caveats of each to allow participants to assess which forms of assessment and grading would best support their current assignments, course goals, and student learning.

Session Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will differentiate various modes and meanings of knowledge and how they connect to assessment modalities.

2. Participants will consider assessment as an opportunity for learning.

3. Participants become familiar with how various assessment practices can be altered with holistic grading strategies to achieve desired outcomes.

Note: If you are interested in attending this session, you may wish to register for  Session B3 – Grading Gets in the Way of My Students’ Learning: Examples of Alternative Grading Strategies – immediately following this panel to hear about how to Detroit Mercy professors have put these techniques into classroom practice.

Audience: Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session A3: The ADA turns 32 in 2022. Where Are We Now?

Presented by Chyelle Pitts-Chatman

Thirty-two years ago, on July 26, 1990, our nation moved closer to the fulfillment of its foundational promise when we passed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  This law provided a blueprint to the world in protecting civil rights for people with disabilities and guidance on how to uphold, enforce, and strengthen them. In the decades that have followed, numerous changes have occurred which impact our practices in higher education. This session will help create awareness surrounding the responsibility of those who are not disabled to do our part in ensuring that individuals with disabilities are not discriminated against as well as provide a review of changes and updates to the legislation.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will explore how the ADA has transformed public awareness and increased enrollment of individuals with various disabilities in higher education
  2. Participants will review what person first language is and appropriate communication with individuals with disabilities.
  3. Participants will consider potential unconscious bias.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session A4: Find the Right Mentoring Format for Your Students (Online Session) 

Presented by Angelina Jaroszewski, Katherine Snyder, and Kathleen Zimmer-Oster 

This session will demonstrate how faculty members have integrated successful student/alumni mentoring activities into their academic programs. Attendees will see the positive impact simple interactions can have on student success first-hand and have the chance to review a variety of mentoring formats available to everyone on campus through the university’s networking platform, Forever Titans. Whether faculty would like to invite guest lecturers, create short-term partnerships, plan long-term mentor pairings, or schedule lunch and learn panels, the Alumni Relations team can meet faculty needs. Participants will learn how they can take advantage of systems already in place. 

Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. The session will create an understanding of the impactful alumni/student interactions toward the success of our students.
  2. The session will provide an opportunity for attendees to brainstorm new mentoring possibilities both in their classroom or in cross-campus collaborations.
  3. The session will introduce attendees to the mentoring platform available to all university faculty and staff in all departments, which entails staff support with the implementation of any program.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Colleague Lunch: 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (75 min.)

Day One Lunch: Cultivating Relationships Across the University

Collaborate and cultivate relationships with your colleagues across the disciplines and across the university as you enjoy a complimentary lunch.

Registration

This event is fully registrated.

B: 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. (60 min.)

Session B1: Cultivating Creativity

Presented by Sara Armstrong

The discussion will cover the benefits of engaging in creative activities. Each participant will explore their interests, their financial requirements, and their physical requirements and then begin to develop a plan for doing creative activities that can be sustained over time. The session will end with a hands-on activity using paper which will allow participants to relax and focus. 

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn the benefits of living a creative life.
  2. Participants will learn to analyze individual needs for developing a creative personal plan.
  3. Participants will engage in a hands-on activity in paper designed to relax and promote creativeness.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session B2: Playing Well in the Sandbox: The Interplay of Emotional Intelligence, Crucial Conversations, and Crucial Accountability

Presented by Nutrena Tate

Communication is key for high-level functioning teams. Leaders are responsible for creating a culture of productivity and open communication. The mode of communication takes emotional intelligence to discern when to engage in crucial conversations while keeping team members accountable for their roles and responsibilities. This session will highlight key strategies to create paths for crucial communication to take place. 

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to define emotional intelligence, crucial conversations, and crucial accountability.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe how emotional intelligence, crucial conversations, and crucial accountability are intertwined.
  3. Attendees will be able to assess personal emotional intelligence scores.
  4. Attendees will be able to apply the concepts of emotional intelligence, crucial conversations, and crucial accountability to past, current, or future work, home, and other organizational instances of communication and leadership.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

This event is fully registrated.

Session B3: Grading Gets in the Way of My Students’ Learning: Examples of Alternative Grading Strategies

Presented by Matthew Mio and Marwa Abdel Latif

After only 125 years in American Higher Ed, the A-F grading system has moved from measure to target (Goodhart’s Law) for everyone involved in education and this session will begin with exploring some of the reasons for this significant change. There are numerous strategies for implementing alternative grading strategies in courses across the disciplines, and the speakers will highlight successful examples of such strategies from their own recent courses. The session will review why particular alternative assessments were successful and highlight specific benefits to students at Detroit Mercy. The presentation will also bring focus to how such practices support DEIJ principles by modeling inclusivity and student-centered teaching practices.

Session Learning Objectives:
1. Attendees will be familiar with the reasons for the movement to end traditional, numerical A-F grading in higher education.
2. Attendees will review examples of alternative strategies put into practice.
3. Attendees will recognize the importance of these alternate grading methods when it comes to DEIJ principles, as evidenced by students in distress during the pandemic.

Audience: Faculty

Note: If you are interested in this session, you may also consider registering for Session A2 – Knowledge, Assessment, and Grading: Theories and Best Practices – immediately preceding this panel to learn more about specific assessment methods and strategies to will promote and measure comprehension or subject matter.

 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session B4: Tapping into Your Students’ Curiosity: Strategies for Enhancing Student Involvement (Online Session)

Presented by Anne Marie Kosi-Kupe and Mary Tracy Bee 

This presentation focuses on teaching strategies that are aimed to enhance student involvement in both in-person and online courses. Blending of traditional and modern methodologies with teaching strategies helps improve students’ interaction in the classroom. While discussing various teaching strategies implemented in classes, the presenters will dive deeper into two specific approaches that they have successfully implemented including cross (directed) approaches and self/group-directed PALIA (Peer & Active Learning in Anatomy) techniques. This session will demonstrate how to apply both approaches in classrooms. Additional time at the end will allow for the audience to share personal experiences and tips for engaging students. 

Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. Attendees will be able to describe factors that influence student learning and engagement including: specific area of learning, maturity, age, intelligence, mental and physical health, learners’ attention, interest, level of aspiration, as well as motivation and previous learning. 
  2. Attendees will be able to describe multiple teaching strategies that lead to student involvement. 
  3. Attendees will begin to map out and design their own teaching plan for an engaging student activity

Audience: Faculty 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

C: 2:15 p.m – 3:30 p.m. (75 min.)

Session C1: Adapting to Academic Scholarly Life (Presented by the Faculty Development Team)

Presented by Louis Davis, Kelli Frost, Wilfred Allen, Mary Bee, and Molly Barlow 

Adapting to academic and scholarly life can be an overwhelming process. However, with clear expectations and a solid plan, faculty can successfully navigate the challenging expectations of the faculty role. Our panel of faculty will provide insights and tips to help others effectively steer through the challenges. Themes include making the time to produce scholarship, creating an environment conducive to successful writing, overcoming challenges of transitioning to academia, the push for productivity, the importance of mentors, wellness, handling student evaluations and ways to encourage their completion. Members of the Faculty Development Team (FDT) will also discuss results from the FDT survey investigating obstacles preventing Associate Professors from applying for Full Professor and how to overcome these roadblocks. Panel and open discussion will allow for conversations covering numerous scholarly issues. 

 Session Learning Objectives: 

1. The attendees will be prepared to discuss the transition to academia and the importance of faculty mentors for support of teaching practices and scholarship productivity.

2. Attendees will understand the strategies for success as they move from Assistant to Associate to Full Professor.

3. Attendees will be able to assess and review student course evaluations.

4. Attendees will develop an action plan for scholarly productivity.

 Audience: Faculty 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session C2: Cultivate Staff Development and Retention by Leading with Compassion

Presented by Rebecca Nowak 

This interactive session will discuss types of leadership styles including leading with compassion. The discussion will cover strategies for becoming and furthering your role as a compassionate leader, including team building, training, giving feedback and having an inclusive workforce where everyone feels included.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand what compassion is and how to successfully lead employees with compassion.
  2. Participants will see how compassion can lead to effective team building, professionalism, and employee retention.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session C3: Partnering with OSPRA: Strategies for Successful Proposal Development

Presented by Ann Serra

The Office for Sponsored Programs and Research Activities (OSPRA) supports research and other scholarly activities of faculty, students, and staff. This is achieved through provision of a range of services that results in attracting federal, state, and local grants, which build our collective capacity to achieve Detroit Mercy’s mission. Successful proposal development is a multi-faceted process that requires coordination between principal investigators, funding agencies, and institutional staff. This presentation will provide information, strategies, and examples of how to collaborate with OSPRA to take full advantage of all the resources the office has to offer.

Session Learning Objectives:
1. Attendees will know the process for engaging with OSPRA and the resources available through its website.
2. Attendees will Distinguish between the components of the grants life cycle including Prospecting, Budgeting, Pre-award, Award Acceptance, Post-award, Compliance and Evaluation.
3. Attendees will Describe the emerging focus on research development as part of a larger emphasis on building institutional capacity and individual research portfolios in a highly competitive environment.
4. Attendees will Understand common proposal components and terminology used in developing and submitting proposals to sponsors.
5. Attendees will Apply strategies for increasing funding for individual investigators at different career levels.
6. Attendees will Identify challenges and solutions for developing successful large-scale, collaborative grant proposals, the emerging importance of team science, and the important role of the research administrator in facilitating these complex projects.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session C4: Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR): Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training (Online Session)

Presented by Nour Lyon, Andrea Kwasky, Roberta Thomas, Kimberly Moner, Erika Budson, and Emily Wisler 

The College of Health Professions in collaboration with the Wellness Center will be presenting Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR): Suicide Prevention gatekeeper training. Participants will learn about the three simple steps to help save a life from suicide. Gatekeepers will be trained to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone for help. Mental health resources will also be provided. 

Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. QPR-trained gatekeepers will understand the common myths and facts surrounding suicidal behavior.
  2. QPR-trained gatekeepers will recognize the early warning signs of suicide. 
  3. QPR-trained gatekeepers will be able to describe ways to offer hope to persons who may be contemplating suicide.  
  4. QPR-trained gatekeepers will learn methods of persuading a person contemplating suicide to get help.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

D: 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. (60 min.)

Session D1: Cultivating Student Writers: Best Practices for Scaffolding, Integration, Reflection, and Transfer

Presented by Lauren Rinke, Sigrid Streit, and Erin Bell

This three-part panel presentation will provide an overview of the writing process, best practices for scaffolding high-stakes writing assignments, ideas for incorporating small-stakes writing assignments to encourage practice and to reinforce student skills, and considerations of using reflection and transfer to help students navigate writing in academic discourse communities. There also will be a focus on assisting students who speak in dialects or languages other than standard English. 

Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will reflect on current teaching practices for writing and how to streamline/improve them in order to enhance outcomes. 
  2. Participants will gain ideas for small and high-stakes writing assignments for pedagogical toolkits. 
  3. Participants will understand Detroit Mercy’s composition courses’ outcomes, how they fit within a students’ holistic education, and how to teach for transfer of writing skills.

 Audience: Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session D2: What the Bleep are we Teaching our STEM Students? Infusing Diversity into Science Curricula 

Presented by Mara Livezy, Prasad Venugopal, and Dawn Archey 

Student-centered pedagogy is the hallmark of an inclusive classroom across all disciplines. While most recent advances in teaching methodology focus on how content is delivered, what content is covered has remained relatively unchanged. This session will reflect on the content traditionally covered in STEM classes, and review strategies to integrate diversity, equity, inclusion (DEI), and mission-driven content into physics and chemistry curricula. 

 Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. Faculty will reflect on content taught in classes.
  2. Faculty will learn some ways to incorporate more diverse content into classes.
  3. Faculty will be asked to develop one idea to implement in the coming year.

 Audience: Faculty 

 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session D3: Continuous Improvement in Support of Enhancing Student Learning

Presented by Karen Lee and the University Assessment Team (Selected Members)

Attendees will engage in activities and discussions focused on continuous-improvement strategies that target the enhancement of student learning.

Session Learning Objectives:

 Participants will demonstrate an understanding of the assessment terms and processes utilized at Detroit Mercy to evaluate student learning.

 Participants will identify best-practice continuous-improvement strategies that target the enhancement of student learning.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session D4: Handshake at University of Detroit Mercy: How Faculty and Staff Can Help Students Launch Their Dream Careers (Online Session)

Presented by Tracey Knowles and Gene LaPouttre

Handshake is an online recruitment system where students and recruiters connect to discuss various internship and career-related opportunities. This session will provide an overview of the system, showcase various online resources, and give insight on Detroit Mercy’s usage over the last academic year. Participants will gain valuable tips they can use to help support the career development process for Detroit Mercy students.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn what Handshake is.
  2. Participants will understand how Handshake helps students in the early stages of their career development.
  3. Participants will discover how faculty and staff can help students benefit from using the system.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Day Two: August 18, 2022

E: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. (60 min.)

Session E1: Supporting International Students for a More Inclusive Learning Environment

Presented by Marwa Abdel Latif, Hiba Assi, and Maryam Yousef

International students who speak English as a second language face additional challenges in academic settings. This workshop will highlight some of these challenges and address teaching practices to implement a more supportive and inclusive learning environment. The facilitators will share suggestions and supporting documents addressing teaching practices and additional feedback based on personal experiences. These practices will be beneficial for all students with diverse backgrounds including first generation, underprepared, non-traditional students, etc.

 

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be informed of a set of challenges for international students who speak English as a second language.
  2. Participants will be provided with a set of solutions and teaching practices to incorporate in course content.
  3. Participants will engage with faculty members in identifying additional modes of implementing support.

 

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session E2: Change Your Syllabus, Change Your Life

Presented by Elizabeth Sherowski

This session will explore the theory behind the learner-focused syllabus and how it improves teaching, learning, and overall satisfaction with the course. Professor Sherowski will discuss the transition from a rule-and-content-focused syllabus to a learner-focused syllabus and how that transition leads to better student outcomes, more engaged learners, and a happier professor. Attendees will have the opportunity to revise a portion of their own syllabus using what they have learned.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will understand the difference between a rule-and-content-focused syllabus and a learner-focused syllabus.
  2. Attendees will learn to use learner-focused syllabi to build a classroom community and include all students.
  3. Attendees will begin to revise their own syllabi to align with learner-focused design.

Audience: Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session E3: Student Engagement in Concurrent, Synchronous, and In-Person Classroom Utilizing Top Hat and Collaborate Ultra

Presented by Sonya Kowalski and Traci Stewart

In the era of COVID, attendance and absence of ill students as well as safety concerns have become of paramount importance. Additionally, many students are burdened with the care of family members with limited resources, all of which can impact student engagement.  The presenters will discuss experiences with the utilization of concurrent synchronous and in-person learning as student-centered pedagogy and demonstrate the use of resources during a practice session that encourages student engagement. 

 Session Learning Objectives:  

  1. Attendees will be able to identify benefits of concurrent synchronous and in-person learning for ill/quarantined students.
  2. Attendees will be able to identify benefits of virtual attendance options for burdened students as faculty promotion of social justice.
  3. Attendees will learn how to utilize tools including Top Hat and Collaborate to encourage student engagement.

Audience: Faculty 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session E4: Promotion and Tenure Dossier Submission for McNichols Campus Faculty (Online Session)

Presented by Alexa Rihana-Abdallah, Karen Lee, Gregory Grabowski, Genevieve Meyers, Gregory Ulferts, Carmon Weekes, and Aloha VanCamp

This session will give an overview of the P&T application and review process and provide information on well documented dossiers that meet department, college/school, and university criteria in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. Additionally, the session will review the online dossier submission process. This session is recommended for any full-time faculty, librarian, or lecturer planning to submit their dossier soon and to any faculty serving on their department or college/school promotion and tenure committees. The session will be presented by both the McNichols P&T Committee and the Office of Academic Affairs.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the P&T application and review process.
  2. Participants will be familiarized with the online dossier submission.
  3. Participants will review the P&T handbook for the McNichols candidates and evaluators.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

F: 10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. (60 min.)

Session F1: The American Language and Culture Program: Academically and Culturally Supporting International Students (Online Session)

Presented by Katie Franklin and Alison Roberts

Learn about what the American Language and Culture Program (ALCP) is and how it serves our international students. This session will educate the Detroit Mercy community on ALCP’s purpose and services, as well as cultural dimensions to keep in mind when interacting with international students. The ALCP, as part of the International Services Office (ISO), helps students meet English language proficiency-related to immigration and admission requirements. In addition, the ALCP offers one-on-one English language support, webinars, and activities for all international students. This session will also provide some tips for supporting the success of all international students. Find out more during this session and bring questions.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the purpose of the ALCP.
  2. Participants will understand the student services provided by the ALCP.
  3. Participants will identify cultural dimensions that may affect international student success.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Important session note: This session will now be online.

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session F2: Submitting for Publication: Choosing a Journal and Styling Your Citations

Presented by Jill Turner and Jennifer Bowen

Scholarship is a requirement for tenure and promotion. Authors frequently are at a loss as to where to submit their manuscript for publication. This session will introduce tools and tips to faculty for identifying potential journals to consider when publishing in their discipline. There are thousands of predatory journals; participants will learn what to look for and how to appraise journal legitimacy. Bibliographic citation management tools can help authors with manuscript preparation; they help streamline the in-text citation, footnote, end note, and bibliography creation process.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to select and use online bibliographic citation management tools for creating references during manuscript preparation.
  2. Participants will be able to research and evaluate potential journals for manuscript submission.
  3. Participants will be able to differentiate between legitimate open access journals and predatory journals when submitting a manuscript.

Audience: Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session F3: Best Practices in Creating and Implementing Rubrics

Presented by Abigail Youngerman 

One strategy for improving student outcomes in a course is the use of rubrics for assessment. Rubrics can also reduce the faculty’s time investment while streamlining and standardizing expectations and scores. Instructors should come prepared with a small, already existing assignment or project to which they are interested in adding a rubric. The basics of rubric creation, including implementation on Blackboard, will be included in this workshop session.  

Session Learning Objectives:  

1. This session will summarize the value of rubrics for student success.
2. This session will summarize value of rubrics for faculty time investment.
3. This session will create a basic rubric for one course assignment.
4. This session will explore how to leverage Blackboard to facilitate the use of rubrics.

Audience: Faculty 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session F4: Cultivating Good Physical and Mental Health Habits (Online Session)

Presented by Sydney Gordinier and Erika Budson

The first step in cultivating a desired culture within University of Detroit Mercy starts with physically and mentally taking care of ourselves. This presentation will discuss stress management, healing from the pandemic, and overall wellbeing. 

Session Learning Objectives:  

  1. Attendees will be able to state three warning signs of physical or mental health issues. 
  2. Attendees will be able to state two behavior modifications that will improve their own life.
  3. Attendees will be able to state one available health resource on campus to use at their disposal.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Featured Online Session: 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. (60 min.)

Featured Session: Supporting DACA, Dreamers, and Undocumented Students (Online Session)

Presented by Marla Guerrero

Join Marla Guerrero, DEI advocate and Chair of the Dreamers Support Committee at Marquette University, to learn how to support and provide resources for current and prospective students, their families, and allies. Learn more about DACA, Dreamers, and the needs and concerns of undocumented students and students from mixed-status families and explore what you can do to contribute to justice, access, and opportunity for students at Detroit Mercy and throughout the country.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to recognize the unique challenges and opportunities of DACA and Dreamer students.
  2. Participants will understand terminology related to students and families in immigrant and mixed-status communities.
  3. Participants will learn to respond with practical, compassionate, and inclusive language and actions to support student success.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

G: 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. (60 min.)

Session G1: Using Flipgrid for Creative Assignments and Community Building

Presented by Mary-Catherine Harrison

Flipgrid is a free, user-friendly teaching tool for video-based assignments and collaboration. Flipgrid enhances face-to-face and online/hybrid classes and can be used in a wide range of non-teaching contexts. This session will look at creative examples of Flipgrid topics and responses and brainstorm and how faculty can use Flipgrid in their own classes or inter-professional collaboration.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to use the Flipgrid tool for creative assignments and community building.
  2. Participants will see examples of Flipgrid projects.
  3. Participants will brainstorm a class assignment or collaborative project using the Flipgrid tool.

Audience: Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session G2: Reflections on Career, Community, and Caring over the Last Half-Century

Presented by Justin Kelly, S.J.

Justin Kelly, S.J., has just completed 50 years of teaching at this institution, first in the English Department, then in Religious Studies. His presentation will describe how the university has changed over the past half-century, and how teaching at Detroit Mercy has changed him, both intellectually and personally. 

Session Learning Objectives: 

  1. This session will provide a historical perspective to allow participants a means to reflect on their own pedagogical practices. 
  2. This session will focus on how a growth mindset can enhance an instructor’s teaching practice.  

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session G3: Title IX Updates: Supporting Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging

Presented by Megan Novell

Get up to date on what’s new in Title IX regulations and sex-and gender-based equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice. The presentation will include an overview of new university policies and initiatives, an introduction to inclusive language and terminology for LGBTQ+ identities, and discussion of how to support and respond to students who experience discrimination, harassment, or other issues. Learn how to get involved in supporting inclusive, welcoming classrooms, workplaces, and campus communities.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand university policies, reporting responsibilities, and protocols.
  2. Participants will learn about and become familiar with inclusive language.
  3. Participants will become more comfortable talking with students and colleagues about sex-and gender-based issues and equality.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session G4: Employee Satisfaction Survey Results

Presented by Shelley Wagnon and Netina Anding-Moore

The results of the 2021-22 College Employee Satisfaction Survey (CESS) conducted through Ruffalo Noel Levitz will be presented. This survey has provided insight on how employees feel about key topics such as campus culture, work environment, mission, and more. Results illustrate the issues employees find most important and key institutional goals as well as compares our institution to others across the nation. All constituents are encouraged to attend this session.

Session Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will learn how these survey results will be used for institutional planning, to improve employee satisfaction, and to move the University forward.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff 

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

H: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (60 min.)

Session H1: Gotta Mindset?

Presented by Heinz Plaumann

In this interactive session, participants will learn to define mindsets and to understand how their life experiences have shaped their life view – or the “lens” of their mindsets, noting how some life lenses include unconscious biases. They will learn how to explore the mindsets of others, developing a more inclusive and diverse “wide-angled” view understanding others and being better understood. Most people are all seeking lives fully lived…This session will be a great learning experience helping to move forward!

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to define mindsets and how they function as life lenses.
  2. Attendees will be able to upgrade and revise their life lenses to better understand others and to be better understood.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session H2: Changes in Modern College Athletics and the Impact on the Detroit Mercy Community

Presented by Stephen Corder

The session will provide an overview of the changing landscape of college athletics, focusing on conference realignment, and legislative changes impacting amateurism, name, image and likeness (NIL), and transfer regulations. The presenter will provide a current summary of these changes and the impact on student-athletes, administrators, and professors in areas such as scheduling, recruiting and retention. The session will conclude with an open dialogue and question and answer period.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be provided with a review of modern college athletics, focusing on recent legislative changes.
  2. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of these legislative changes and how they impact student-athletes and other university stakeholders.
  3. Participants will learn ways to provide better support for student-athletes and campus stakeholders impacted by these changes.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session H3: Beacon: Shining a Light for Student Success

Presented by Felicia Hartinger and Michael Verdusco

This session for faculty that are student advisors will offer discussion and training in Beacon, the new early-alert system at Detroit Mercy! This system allows student needs to be identified and addressed by the university community member that is best positioned to address those needs. The new system will allow faculty, advisors, and other community members to work together as a connected success network. This new system will also provide more insight for advisors with comprehensive profiles and actionable views to support student needs.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the purpose of the Beacon system and the need for community involvement.
  2. Participants will be able to describe the types of alerts available through the Beacon system.
  3. Participants will learn how to submit academic referrals.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty, Staff

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Session H4: Evidence-Based Methods to Mitigate Learning Loss (Online Session)

Presented by Grace Jacek

Educators navigate the complexities of course delivery in the setting of evolving public health concerns during the pandemic. Students with unique coping skills must adapt by learning in a variety of environments ranging from virtual to face-to-face settings. As a result of fluctuating hybrid models, students have variable challenges to cognitive load which may result in learning loss. Faculty look to design appealing learning experiences that are effective in engaging diverse types of learners. Teaching effective study methods is imperative to student success. In this 60-minute session, we will explore efficacious evidence-based study methods to maximize learning without exceeding cognitive load.

Session Learning Objectives:

  1. The learner will identify causes of student learning loss.
  2. The learner will identify types of student cognitive load.
  3. The learner will identify evidence-based study methods to mitigate learning loss.

Audience: Administrators, Faculty

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.

Mentoring Workshop: Presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD)
August 25, 2022

Re-Thinking Mentoring: How to Build Communities of Inclusion, Support, and Accountability

The CETL, in conjunction with the Build Grant program, is excited to offer a special workshop regarding best peer mentoring practices for faculty. Presented by the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD), this all-day event is designed to start a new type of discussion about mentoring by describing the common problems that pre-tenure and post-tenure faculty members experience and why traditional mentoring programs fail to meet those needs.

The workshop will propose an alternative framework for mentoring that focuses on needs assessment and shifts the idea of mentoring from a relationship between two faculty members towards building a broad network of support, community and accountability. This all-day workshop concludes with a presentation of best practices in mentoring pre-tenure, under-represented and mid-career faculty.

Audience: Administrators and faculty with mentoring or mentoring program support responsibilities

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Lunch from 12 p.m to 1 p.m.

Lunch will be provided.

Location: ES 120

Registration

Registrations are closed for this event.